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Home » Books » Rubber » Compounding

 
An Introduction to Rubber Technology


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An Introduction to Rubber Technology
Author: A. Ciesielski, Holz Rubber Company
ISBN 978-1-85957-150-7

Published: 2000
Second Edition

Pages: 174, Figures: 46, Tables: 2



Price: $144.00 + S&H
  • Summary
  • Table of Contents
  • Author(s)
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An Introduction to Rubber Technology is the ideal basic guide for anyone who is about to start working with rubber. This handbook has information about every aspect of using rubber from the initial selection of the rubber compound to the measurement of its physical properties. A brief history of the uses of natural and synthetic rubber is included but the bulk of the book concentrates on the compounding and processing of rubber to produce rubber products.
The different types of rubbers and their properties are described and a detailed description of how to formulate rubber compounds including the use of additives, fillers, antioxidants and plasticizers is given. There are also chapters on how to process rubber and how to test both cured and uncured rubber. The chemistry, physics and engineering properties of rubber are described and how they relate to the final rubber compound is explained. The final chapter covers the preparation and use of castable polyurethanes. Each chapter is fully referenced and also includes an extensive bibliography.
This book will be invaluable to anyone who is seeking basic information about rubber technology but it will also appeal to engineers, purchasing agents, rubber chemists and students who need an introductory text in the subject.

History
Types of rubber and their essential properties
The basic rubber compound
Rubber equipment and its use
The rubber laboratory
Chemistry
Engineering
Castable polyurethanes
References
Suggested further reading
Appendix
Index

Andrew Ciesielski is a member of the Royal Society of Chemistry in England (CChem., MRSC) and a member of the Rubber Division of the American Chemical Society. He is past president of The Northern
California Rubber Group (affiliated to the American Chemical Society) of which he is a member of the board of directors. He has a wealth of experience accrued over 25 years in the rubber industry, and is currently Technical Director of the Holz Rubber Company in California.

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